Yoga Videos for Kids – Learn Tadasana (Video)

Jodi Epstein
By  | 

Associating the words “yoga” with “kids” is still relatively new in the Western world.
 
I’ve found that most people, although pleasantly surprised, are surprised nonetheless when they hear that I teach yoga for preschoolers. I am passionate about introducing yoga to young children because of what neuroscience has taught us about early brain development.
 
Studies have proven that the human brain is the most malleable and permeable from birth to age 5. During this window of time, in addition to learning gross and fine motor skills, a child’s social and emotional skills are being shaped. These milestones are the building blocks for later successes. This is why parents, teachers, doctors and therapists watch to see how and when the children they take care of move and play.
 
Yoga is a practice that offers strength, flexibility, and stress reduction, as well as lifestyle values that include mindfulness, gratitude and loving kindness. So, what better age to start learning and practicing all of the above than when the brain is the most absorbent? THIS is why yoga can be an excellent and important addition to a young child’s life.
 
To get started as a parent, let go of the way you’ve experienced yoga in an adult class. Yoga for kids is not the same as yoga for adults since the attention span and capabilities of children are drastically different.
 
If you’re interested in sharing yoga with your child, think of it as an activity where you’ll offer elements of yoga, but remember that young children learn through play. In fact, feel free to call it “Yoga Play Time”!
 

 
Here are a few tips to start teaching your young children yoga:
 

Designate a space

Take out a yoga mat or clear a space where you and your child have a bit of room to move. Designate a space for your “Yoga Play Time.”
 

Make a sound

Start with an Om, the ringing of chimes, or one deep breath to indicate that you’re doing a specific, special activity.
 

Get creative with what you name the poses

You know your child better than anyone. What are their interests? Animals, bugs, cars, shapes, etc. all can become yoga poses! Think of the yoga poses that you might take in your adult class. Many of them were inspired by what the first yogis found in nature. Get creative, or get on Google for inspiration!
 

Get silly

Don’t be afraid to be silly! Appealing to your child’s sense of humor will help get them – and keep them – engaged. Try Happy Baby pose while sticking out your tongue. This one is always a winner. 🙂
 

Establish the end

“Yoga Play Time” doesn’t have to be more than 10-20 minutes, but always have a specific ending that indicates your “Yoga Play Time” is over. I recommend practicing Savasana while listening to a short lullaby. You can also offer your child a foot rub while they rest (I’ve heard from many parents that this is their three year old’s favorite part of yoga).
 
 
One of the first postures we all learn in yoga is Tadasana or “Mountain pose.” It is the foundational standing pose that serves as a starting point for other standing asanas. It encourages good posture and proper upright alignment. When we stand still, we practice patience and presence. When we stand with awareness, we practice strengthening our body as it negotiates with gravity.
 
Tadasana is a great way to begin sharing yoga with your child. In the “Jodi the Yogi” series Tadasana video, a musical sun salutation is introduced to help release energy. “Millie the Mountain” offers Tadasana as a yoga pose where kids can practice being “steady and strong” in both body and mind.
 

This video was made for the little yogis, but feel free to join in on the fun, because Tadasana is for everyone!


 
Questions, comments, or concerns about teaching your little yogi Tadasana, or any yoga pose in general? Want to share your experience? Please reach out in the comments below!
 

This article has been read 1K+ times. Feelin’ the love!

Comments

wonderful comments!

Jodi Epstein

Teacher, musician and creator of the children’s program, Jodi the Yogi, Jodi makes sure to laugh at least three times every day. She considers her small yogi students to be her greatest source of inspiration. When Jodi’s not teaching, she’s on the mat learning or off the mat playing. “It is a happy talent to know how to play.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

joditheyogi.com

Practice with top instructors in the
comfort of your own home.
See the Classes

JOIN US ON THE GRAM LET’S HANG @YOGIAPPROVED

Send this to a friend

Follow us on

Already have an account? Login


Create an Account

New to site? Create an Account


Login

Lost password?