Just Can’t Get Over It? Practice These 5 Yoga Poses to Release Anger

Kaitlin Vogel
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Listen. We all deal with anger. It’s a part of life. But there are healthy ways to deal with anger (and not-so-healthy ways too) . . .

If you’re struggling to control your temper, or if your initial reaction is to yell and scream when you’re feeling angry, you’re not alone. Many of us struggle with anger.

In some situations, anger is a normal response when we’ve been physically or emotionally hurt. It’s not a matter of avoiding anger altogether, because that would mean ignoring your feelings and not processing your emotions.

It’s about learning how to process your anger and move through it so you can move on from it.

The good news is there are many healthy ways to deal with anger, and one of the most effective ways to release anger is yoga. In fact, according to a study published in Frontiers In Psychology, practicing yoga can help control anger and improve the impulses that surround anger.
 
 

Practice These 5 Yoga Poses to Release Anger:

 

1. Easy Seated Pose (Sukhasana) With Breath of Fire

Find Sukhasana, or Easy Seated Pose, and take a moment to feel grounded and connected to the earth here. This simple step of mindfulness will help center you and start pulling you from the grips of anger.

feel-good-yoga-sequence_sukasana

Now you’re ready to practice Breath of Fire Pranayama for a full 60 seconds. Commit to releasing any built up anger that you have been suppressing. Allow that anger to rise up to the surface and as you exhale, let it go.

Not Sure How to Practice? Here’s a Breath of Fire Pranayama Tutorial

When you’re done, open your palms and stretch your arms overhead. This provides a direct channel to release your anger. If you feel like you have any lingering emotions, scream for a few seconds to let it go.

Screaming therapy, also known as primal therapy, is scientifically proven to be good for your health. So go ahead and let it all out! You’ll feel better after you do.
 

 
 
Then, let your arms fall down by your sides and sit in silence for a few minutes. Notice how you feel. Is there a shift in your emotional state? Do you feel like a weight has been lifted?

How it helps release anger:
Sukhasana helps you get grounded, which is the first step in releasing negative emotions. Breath of Fire deeply focuses the mind, detoxifies the body, and shifts the energy so you can let. it. go.
 

2. Camel Pose (Ustrasana)

Begin in a kneeling position with your hips stacked over your knees. Place your palms against your low back, bringing your elbows in toward the center of your back. Begin to gently press your hips forward as you lift from the chest and send your gaze towards the ceiling.

Camel-Pose-Michelle-blue

You can stay here. If Camel Pose is part of your practice and you’d like to take the final expression, slowly reach down and grab your heels with each hand.

Not Sure How to Practice? Here’s How to Access Camel Pose Safely

Wherever you are, stay there for five deep breaths. When you’re ready, come out of Camel Pose slowly and rest your seat to your heels. Bring your hands into your lap and sit quietly with your eyes open (so you don’t get dizzy) breathing deeply for another 5-10 breaths, noticing how you feel both emotionally and physically.

How it helps release anger:
Camel Pose is a big heart opener. Heart openers activate the Heart Chakra, inviting in and sending out love, helping to melt away the anger.

Crack Your Heart Open With These 7 Heart Opening Yoga Poses
 

3. Revolved Crescent Lunge (Parivrtta Anjaneyasana)

Start in Low Crescent Lunge Pose with your right foot forward. Bring your hands to heart center and keeping your spine lengthened, hinge your torso forward slightly as you hook your left elbow to the outside of your right knee.

Revolved-Crescent-Lunge-Twist

Option to push your elbow against the outside of your leg for a deeper twist. Make sure your shoulders are relaxed away from your ears.

Slowly straighten into your back leg (you can keep a micro bend in your back knee) and press down through your back left heel. As you twist, pull in your lower abdomen and lift your torso away from your thigh.

Stay in this pose for 30-60 seconds (or longer if it’s part of your practice), and then repeat on the other side.

How it helps release anger:
Twists nourish and massage the spinal column. When we’re angry, we physically become closed off, rounding the spine and creating tension in the body. This twist helps release tension so you can then release your anger.
 

4. Goddess Pose (Utkata Konasana) with Ganesha Mudra

Mudras, which translates to “seal” in Sanskrit, are symbolic gestures of the hands to support the flow of energy within the body. Different parts of the hands are linked to different areas in the body and brain.

goddess

Common Mudras, Their Meaning, and How to Practice Them

By placing our hands in mudras, we stimulate specific areas, which can alter our state of mind. The Ganesha Mudra, named after the Hindu elephant deity who removes obstacles, is believed to help alleviate anger.
 

 
 
Start in Goddess Pose with your heels in, toes out, and knees gently pressing outward.

Bring your left hand in front of your sternum, palm facing outward with your thumb pointing down. Bring your right hand in front of the left, palm facing toward you, with your thumb pointing up. Bend your fingers and hook the right fingers with the left fingers, your elbows pointing outward.

Inhale deeply and as you exhale, pull your elbows away from one another, keeping your fingers interlocked. Take five deep breaths here.

How it helps release anger:
The Ganesha Mudra combined with Goddess Pose promotes better blood circulation and releases tension in the shoulders and chest, helping to open up the Heart Chakra.

Goddess Pose also opens the hips and cultivates confidence and strength so you can release your anger and move on.

The Heart Chakra: Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Your Fourth Chakra
 

5. Corpse Pose (Savasana)

As a pose of total relaxation and deep restoration, Savasana is a great way to complete your yoga to release anger practice.

Savasana-Pose

To begin, lie on your back with your legs extended long and arms by your sides with your palms facing up. Keep your eyes closed, breathe naturally and allow your body to sink into the mat – from the tips of your toes all the way up to your eyebrows and forehead, fully relax and soften.

Starting from the soles of your feet and moving to the top of your head, release any lingering tension. Invite peace and calm into your mind, body and spirit. Stay in this position for five minutes.

How it helps release anger:
Practicing Savasana helps you rejuvenate and recharge by activating the parasympathetic nervous system, also known as the “rest and digest” reaction in the body. This pose lowers blood pressure and heart rate, which is particularly beneficial when it comes to releasing anger.
 
 

Tame Your Temper and Use Yoga to Release Anger

There’s no denying that controlling your rage can be a challenge. Give yourself permission to tune in to what is fueling your anger and try to let it go.

Yoga can be one of the most effective, healthy ways to release anger. These yoga poses can help.

Restorative yoga can alleviate both anger and stress – which often go hand-in-hand. The next time you’re feeling angry or stressed, try this 30-minute yoga sequence for stress relief.

When it comes to choosing the type of yoga that’s right for you, the first step is seeing how your anger is manifesting in your body.

Some people may benefit from more energizing yoga practices like Kundalini Yoga or Ashtanga Yoga, while others may find the slower and calming practices more helpful.

And as you practice, you may find that you enjoy a mix of both.

This article has been read 2K+ times. Feelin’ the love!

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Kaitlin Vogel

Kaitlin has worked as a professional writer and editor in New York City for over seven years. Beyond her professional experience in journalism and psychology, it is her keen interest in personal development that has driven every one of her career decisions thus far. She's committed to creating content that matters.

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